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Requirement1

Page history last edited by hochedona@... 5 years, 11 months ago

Requirement 1

Personal Examples on Hofstede Dimensions

 

Power Distance:

 

Aisha Ahmed - India:

High: In my work environment I have a high respect for higher authority and find it  somewhat difficult to talk to people in high positions. I have a very good relationship with my direct manager but I often don’t question the tasks assigned to me; I do them regardless of whether I feel they necessarily make sense because as someone in a lower position I don’t have a choice.

 

Kevin Glass - America:

Low: I came from a working class neighborhood, which by American standards was poor. As an undergraduate, I was the only working class person among the children of several powerful, well-connected people. I was accepted as part of this group and I continue to be today.

 

Madona Hoch - Syria:

High: In my previous work environment, lower position people would just be following the instructions that’s given to them by higher position people. Most of the time, they wouldn’t be involved in any type of decision making and usually the concept of suggesting new ideas doesn’t exist for these people. ِEmployees usually call their bosses by their titles (Mr., Ms., Mrs., ...) unless there’s any type of personal relationships that will make an informal relationship between this specific employee and the boss.

 

Rodolfo Loo - America:

Low: Professionally, my team and my workplace operates with low power distance. I encourage my team to be vocal about issues and or status that could affect the project. I actually look for feedback good or bad and they are welcome to do that via “open door policy”. Additionally I do typically bridge the personal gap with my team I will often view them with a emotional connection. My company also has low power distance environment. I have easy access to my leadership also through “open door policy”.]

 

 

Individualism vs. Collectivism:

 

Aisha Ahmed - India:

Collectivism: In my personal life, all major decisions, for example like marriage, need to be approved by my direct family, my extended family and sometimes even by people who are so close they are practically family. My future fiancé has to be accepted by everyone in my accepted circle, otherwise I will be known as the girl who brought shame to her parents. Therefore, many of my actions are influenced in one way or another by those around me.

 

Kevin Glass - America:

Individualism: The most recent example I can think of, with respect to individualism, was a group project (not in this class). I worked in a team of four people on a complex project that required a lot of calculation and writing. Within the first week, it became clear that my teammates had no interest in doing any of the work, so, over the span of five weeks, I completed the entire project without their input.

 

Madona Hoch - Syria:

Collectivism: In my culture, family comes always number one. people usually have strong relationships with their immediate family and the extended one. kids would never leave their parent’s house till they got married, even if the girl is 30 or 40 years old, usually she would still living with her parents. In all occasions, the main celebration would be with the family, then friends come after that. Calling the extended family in Christmas or any occasion is so much important and parents always make sure that they and their kids did call other people in the family. People care a lot about each other and always be there when somebody needs anything.

 

Rodolfo Loo - America:

Individualism: Personally and professionally, I lean strongly to individualism. Personally I have always volunteered my friendship and my communication between friends and family, and myself has always been low-context. This also carries over into my professional interactions. I typically use a direct business style in my emails to clients. Although I usually lighten up the tone of my emails with my team, but still direct.

My relationship with my employer is based on mutual advantage. If I succeed, they succeed. I am allowed to perform my tasks with a fairly high level independence.

 

 

Masculinity vs. Femininity:

 

Aisha Ahmed - India:

Masculine: I am somewhat competitive in nature and that’s partially due to the way I was raised. I want to work my way up in the workplace so that I can one day hold an executive position in IT. I like working with people and do so in a feminine way where I often bring baked goods for the team or take people out to lunch. While I can give examples of both, I relate more to masculinity than femininity because I often always look for the bottom line and do what I need to do to get things done.

 

Kevin Glass - America:

Masculine: I had shoulder surgery a few years ago. It was arthroscopic and I've had this kind of surgery before. Based on my past experience, I decided that three days of pain-killers was sufficient and stopped taking them. After the first day, I could not make it through a full workday. I made it through the day after that, but it was difficult. On the third day, one of my colleagues told me I looked like a ghost. I was rush to urgent care, pump full of morphine and threatened by the doctor that if I didn't take the drugs, she would conspire with my wife to put me in the hospital and force me to take them.

 

Madona Hoch - Syria:

Femininity: My culture tend to have more feminine approach than Masculine. People are much important to us than actual achievements and success. We would support cooperation, caring for the weak and quality of life more than material rewards for success. I believe that eventually we shouldn’t forget that we’re all human being before there was any technology in this world and we shouldn’t let work, money be more precious than how we deal with each and appreciate the feelings and emotions that we have as human that all technologies won’t be able to let you feel specific way.

 

Rodolfo Loo - America:

Femininity: I believe I have a feminine approach to management. I generally care about my team members and want them to be satisfied with their role and responsibilities. I would definitely appreciate more leisure time over money at this point in my career. As I’ve mentioned previously, I tend to narrow the emotional gap between myself and my team members. I feel there is a human element to working and communicating directly and causally.

 

 

Uncertainty Avoidance:

 

Aisha Ahmed - India:

Medium: While I am a planner at work, I don’t have a high level professional or personal plan for the next 5 years. In high school I knew I wanted to go to college but I didn’t think about how I was going to pay for it until the last 6 months of senior year. I plan for things that I absolutely need to plan for, especially at work, but things in my personal life are often done somewhat spontaneously. I don’t get anxiety for some things because I know I will take care of them one way or another eventually.

 

 Kevin Glass - America:

Medium: My work place is run by managers who make unclear or insinuated comments. The lab director will say “this meeting is optional,” but my boss will say, “you have to go.” Though I'm sure the meeting is not optional, there is always a question about whether I'm missing something or angering someone.

 

Madona Hoch - Syria:

High: As of my culture I think we have high uncertainty avoidance. We tend to like stuff that’s already experienced and we know that it works than to change to something completely new and unknown results. Although, I’m personally strongly agree that if you didn’t try something new, how would you know what you have is good/bad? from a personal experience, I think the more you know people from different cultures/backgrounds, the more you tend to understand different opinions and accept that people are different and that will make you deal much more easier with people around you in work/personal life.

 

Rodolfo Loo - America:

Not Determined: In this area I have more difficulty defining a real sentiment since I can find example in both weak and strong uncertainty avoidance.

One example, is that I strongly align and agree with the weak aspect of “what is different is curious” versus dangerous. I think change is generally good and something that should be observed and in most cases promoted.

An example of strong uncertainty avoidance is that my occupation comes with some good amount of stress and with that anxiety. I have learned to cope over the years but I still find it unsettling that it is a part of my near daily life.

 

 

Long term vs. Short term Orientation:

 

Aisha Ahmed - India:

Long term: I have grown up in American culture and therefore, to some extent, I have adapted to the way Americans do things rather than keep to my Indian roots. For example, over time I have changed to more modern ways. Now, I live independently from my direct family, have a job, drive a car, and follow American social mannerisms in my daily life. I believe change is a good thing so you can keep up with changing times and adapt to different things in order to succeed. I often forgo things that have short term beneficial gain for things that have long term beneficial gain.

 

Kevin Glass - America:

Short Term: America. Long-standing traditions? The only thing I can think of is green bean casserole on Thanksgiving. In my work life, I always have near-term deadlines. So I move from task to task on a regular basis. In the last year, I have given about a two dozen lectures on a wide range of topics, I have co-authored a half dozen papers, I have worked on projects ranging for global warming to electrical power distribution. In the coming year, I have no idea what I might be doing. And I like it that way.

 

Madona Hoch - Syria:

Short Term: Daily life in general is more important to us than the future, that’s why we do really focus on the short-term orientation more than long-term. we feel like you never know what’s gonna happen in 10 years, let’s just enjoy the moment. That’s being said, we do focus on the present more than the future. However, the long-term future is still important to us and we think about it but without forgetting that we’re living in the present and that your future’s decisions are going to be based on your current situation so you would better focus on your current situation to get a better future.

 

 Rodolfo Loo - America:

Short Term: My role as project manager naturally positions me to be more short-term oriented. I do have to execute on projects that run generally 6 months to 1 year. As I have mentioned previously I do value leisure time at this point in my career. I also feel that I have a good and consistent view of good versus evil, but I do admit there are times that the definition can get blurred. There are times to be in some regard evil if there is a benefit.

A long-term orientation that I do relate with is the concept that disagreement does not hurt. Again with change and feedback both are welcome in my camp.

 

 

 Indulgence vs. Restraint:

 

Aisha Ahmed - India:

Restraint: I associate with American culture in many ways but I hold back a lot too due to religious and cultural constraints. I don’t drink no matter how much pressure I get because it is not culturally/religiously accepted. I don’t spend a lot of money on things that I find too indulgent and also stay away from things my culture views as inappropriate or wrong such as late night partying or travelling by myself just for fun.

 

Kevin Glass - America:

Indulgence: I like to think of myself of a very restrained person, but a cursory examination of most of my habits indicate the this is obviously not true. My wife and I will go out to dinner with friends and we always eat far too much and drink much more than we should. We aren’t usually too boisterous, but we are loud and we are very expressive in our speech and mannerisms.

 

Madona Hoch - Syria:

Restraint: In this dimension I’m just way far from my culture. My culture in general is a fairly restraint culture, we do care a lot about what people are going to say if you stay late at night, there’s huge amount of differentiating between girls and guys. Guys are always allowed to do anything they want and stay late at night however they want but not girls. At some point you would feel that you’re not living for yourself, instead you’re living for people and do what people want you to do. In contrast, I used to be like this when I was younger, after I grew up and thought about these stuff, it didn’t make sense to me at all and just became not part of my society in this area. I do believe that it’s my right to live my life the way how I want and the way how I see it, not the way how my parents want. I love enjoying my nights with friends and traveling all over the world with friends. Drinking wise, I do drink but I never lost control of myself and I do believe that if you get drunk, you might start saying stuff that you usually don’t say in front of random people and hence you will lose your respect.

 

Rodolfo Loo - America:

Indulgence: I very strongly align myself with indulgence. There are many aspects of it that I can relate. For example, the consumption of soft drinks and beer. I admittedly do drink a fair amount of beer. Culturally and personally I highly value free speech. Although more this applies more to the public image of governmental leadership, I do try to exude a positive and joyful expression when publicly communicating with my team.

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